Tag Archives: traditional arts

The Common Good

The Common Good Upper Canada Fibreshed

On the corner of the Cockshutt Road and the 11th Concession just outside of Waterford in Norfold County, The Common Good is part slow fashion marketplace and fibre arts creative space, part social enterprise tea-room and part faith-based farm community.

Conceived of and built by Rita Stratford, The Common Good combines “farm, fellowship and faith”. Inside the large creative space within the barn-like house, complete with gorgeous wrap-around porch, women are encouraged to explore the fibre arts by learning from one another and participating in classes that range from natural dyeing to weaving.

The Common Good Upper Canada Fibreshed

The space also houses a cooperatively run tea-room and a local-based marketplace that focuses on promoting slow-fashion and slow-craft.

Rita, an advocate for the “slow goods” movement, seeks to encourage a cultural shift towards slowing down and being responsible with our collective resources, supporting our local economy, creating community through trust and relationships, nurturing our creative souls and connecting with the makers of our goods.

The Common Good Upper Canada Fibreshed

In keeping with this philosophy, Rita raises a small flock of sheep on The Common Good farm.  Cotswold, Gotland and Polworth sheep produce her range of raw fleeces, yarns, rovings and batts.

The Common Good is not your average local yarn store, local marketplace or fibre farm. While it may always defy definition as it continues to grow as a self-sustaining and living entity, it certainly offers a space where the fibre arts are seen as an opportunity to recharge the soul and seek a spiritual journey.

In Rita’s words, “The Common Good may be hard to define but it is simple to experience”.

 

 

The Common Good

946 Concession 11 Townsend Road in Waterford, ON

tcgshepherd@icloud.com |  519-428-8894

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Producer Profile: Deborah Livingstone-Lowe of Upper Canada Weaving

UCW

Deborah Livingston-Lowe studied woven textiles at the Ontario Collage of Art and Design (OCAD) and has 30 years of experience in weaving, antique textile restoration and appraising. Working out of her attic studio in Toronto, she brings a unique design aesthetic to her work, drawing form a deep historical knowledge of Canadian textile design from the 19th Century. Her weaving is beautiful. Just ask Peggy Sue Collection Inc., which features Deborah’s weaving in both her Spring/Summer 2016 and Fall/Winter 2016 collection or Upper Canada Mercantile for which she is the principle weaver of throws, blankets and scarfs.

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